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Thread: F1 boss Chase Carey attacks FIA over complicated rules that fans ‘really can’t follow

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    F1 boss Chase Carey attacks FIA over complicated rules that fans ‘really can’t follow

    Formula One’s boss Chase Carey has launched an astonishing attack on the sport's rule makers for over-complicating it through the introduction of regulations that fans “really can't follow.”

    F1 is famous for its fiercely complex regulations which are written by its governing body the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and control everything from the size of certain parts of the cars to the areas of the track that drivers are allowed to race on.

    “We have got too many complicated penalties and rules," said Carey at a recent investor conference.

    "We have got a 100-page regulation book. We have got to get the business to a place where it is easier to follow and has fewer complexities that fans out there really can't follow.

    “It will always be a complicated sport that is a marriage of sporting competition and technology but we need to make it something that is more in line with what the fans want to see and what excites and energises them.”

    F1 race results are regularly determined by the allocation of penalties for breaking the regulations. Worse still, the penalties are often applied in the late stages of the races or even after they have finished leading to results being changed retrospectively. It fuels confusion for fans and even the drivers themselves.

    Most recently, F1 was forced to do a U-turn on the result of last month’s Brazilian Grand Prix when stewards demoted Lewis Hamilton from third place and handed it to McLaren driver Carlos Sainz Jr. It was the best result of his career but because the stewards' decision was made more than two hours after the end of the race he didn’t get onto the podium.

    Even more memorably, at the Canadian Grand Prix in June, Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel finished in first place but before he had even got out of his car he was stripped of his victory for driving on the grass 22 laps earlier. He was officially classified in second place behind Hamilton, putting the Briton on course to win a sixth championship.

    Vettel was so incensed that he switched the first place sign in front of Hamilton’s car with the one he had been given and said “everybody is to blame. The problem is we are hurt with these things. I think they started a long time ago. Did he cross the white line, or use too much kerb? Let us do what we want. If you are unhappy with how we race and how we drive then build different tracks – it’s as easy as that. We have so many pages in our regulations, if you want you find the paragraph that suits. How can you change it? Just burn the papers.”

    Ironically, his comments echo the views of prominent F1 critic, Jeremy Clarkson. Earlier this year the former Top Gear presenter said that in order to rev up its appeal, F1 needs to “get rid of the stewards. Dangerous driving is what fans want so if someone does dangerous driving I’d give them an extra five championship points.”

    Clarkson added that “the governing body needs to look at what cricket did. They had a five-day boring sport and they turned it what we saw in the final of the World Cup - super overs and crowds chanting.”

    Over the past 11 years F1’s global television audience has crashed by 18.3 per cent to 490.2m viewers fuelled by a move from free-to-air to Pay TV stations. In Britain the sport has lost a cumulative total of more than 6m viewers in the last year alone according to data from the Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board (BARB). It has been driven by a new contract which sees Sky exclusively showing all but one of the races live.

    It makes it even harder for F1's popularity to accelerate but it hasn’t given up. Last month the sport announced that in 2021 it will introduce new aerodynamics regulations in a bid to put an end to Hamilton’s dominance.

    It also hopes to level the playing field by limiting team budgets to £136m ($175m) with the penalty for severe cases of overspending being exclusion from the championship. However, as The Independent recently revealed, decisions on whether teams have breached the budget cap won't be made until months after the end of the season so there could be more confusion over F1’s results to come.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/...-a9232211.html
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    Grosjean: Not the tyres you would dream of

    Covering 146 laps during Tuesday’s Pirelli tyre test, Romain Grosjean has a fair idea about the 2020 Pirelli tyres and says they are “not what you would dream of”.

    With Haas having struggled with their tyres throughout the 2019 season, Grosjean was one of the busiest drivers out on track on Day One of the two-day test.

    The Frenchman covered two-and-a-half grand prix distances with a best time of 1:39.536 on next year’s C5s.

    He, however, isn’t sure Pirelli should be making the change.

    “I don’t know. It’s too early to stay. But it shouldn’t really be a question, should it?” he told Autosport.

    “That’s where we are. If you ask me right now, I don’t know.

    “Depending on the track I would tell you one or the other. [But] this is not going to happen.

    “After one year of development, you would like to be saying, ‘I am going to race the 2020, no question’.”

    Unfortunately for Haas, Grosjean doesn’t believe the 2020 compounds will resolve his team’s tyre issues.

    “They [the 2020 tyres] are different,” Grosjean said. “There are some positives and there are some negatives.

    “They did a big change. We need to look at how we’ve been running the cars and make sure we are on the maximum of everything.

    “But, if you ask me if I’m very happy about the new tyres, and [if] this is going to solve some of the problems – the thermal degradation, sensitive to following another car – I just have to tell the truth.

    “And no, it’s not going to change that problem fully.

    “The degradation on some compounds was better. Being able to run lower pressures also helps you. So those are the positives.

    “But it’s not what you would dream of.”
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    Rules are made to be broken! The best example is Max. From crashstapen to one of the top drivers in 2019 F-1 . Every race I was hoping Charles a pole; would win the race; or a podium, but I watched Max the whole race through to see him in action. The drivers also had him on their mind. Again; rules are meant to be broken! Imagine every driver finishing from where they started just not to break any F-1 rules! There should be a fine for a pit stop over 2 sec.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brembo View Post
    Rules are made to be broken! The best example is Max. From crashstapen to one of the top drivers in 2019 F-1 . Every race I was hoping Charles a pole; would win the race; or a podium, but I watched Max the whole race through to see him in action. The drivers also had him on their mind. Again; rules are meant to be broken! Imagine every driver finishing from where they started just not to break any F-1 rules! There should be a fine for a pit stop over 2 sec.
    Wow, you have turned another thread into a Max love nest. Kudos
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    In this case, Mr. Carey is right. I didn't like their ideas of changing F1 into a Nascar-like show with reverse grid and sprint races or bs like that but in this case, he nailed it. Regulations are needed but not this much. Drivers slowly turned into crying machines over the smallest things on track, they are complaining all the time to get a penalty for their opponents. Thats ridiculous. Not to mention that in F1, innovation should be a distinctive factor between team engineers but it isnt anymore. You build a car and then you are stuck with it for the rest of the season. You can fine tune it but you cannot change it or improve it drastically as engineers' hands are bided by the rules. Thats how for example Mercedes has been able to keep their advantage for 6 years! By having a huge advantage that cannot be reduced thanks to the rules.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vcs316 View Post
    Wow, you have turned another thread into a Max love nest. Kudos
    Thanks , compliments will get you everywhere!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisFerrari View Post
    In this case, Mr. Carey is right. I didn't like their ideas of changing F1 into a Nascar-like show with reverse grid and sprint races or bs like that but in this case, he nailed it. Regulations are needed but not this much. Drivers slowly turned into crying machines over the smallest things on track, they are complaining all the time to get a penalty for their opponents. Thats ridiculous. Not to mention that in F1, innovation should be a distinctive factor between team engineers but it isnt anymore. You build a car and then you are stuck with it for the rest of the season. You can fine tune it but you cannot change it or improve it drastically as engineers' hands are bided by the rules. Thats how for example Mercedes has been able to keep their advantage for 6 years! By having a huge advantage that cannot be reduced thanks to the rules.
    And its the only sport where you cannot practice (test) except on race weekends. How will a team improve its performance and arrive at the track knowing the new parts/setup/upgrades will work? Its become an overly regulated & complicated sport wherein rules are interpreted/enforced as per convenience.
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    F1 changes controversial weighbridge rule for 2020

    Formula 1 has changed its controversial weighbridge rules for 2020 on the back of complaints about penalties that were handed out this year.

    Pierre Gasly - then driving for Red Bull - was forced to start from pitlane in Azerbaijan for accidentally missing the weighbridge checks during Friday practice, while Racing Point's Sergio Perez was hit with the same penalty for an identical infraction at the US Grand Prix.

    The heavy penalties prompted complaints from their teams that the sanction was out of kilter with the offence.

    Red Bull team boss Christian Horner told Sky after Gasly's Baku incident: "If he had been running 50 kilos underweight, his penalty would have been less than what he actually got for missing that light.

    "This regulation is a hangover from when we used to have qualifying on a Friday and, if qualifying got cancelled, then they would refer back to the times of the previous practice.

    "It is about as draconian as you can possibly get."

    However, the way the regulations were worded meant that any driver who missed the weighbridge on a Friday and whose car was worked on was automatically given a pitlane start.

    Following discussions between teams and the FIA, it was agreed that the rules needed modifying.

    Now, following approval by the World Motor Sport Council, more freedom will be given to the stewards from 2020 to decide on the sanction.

    The rules now state that if a driver misses the weighbridge and his car is worked on then it will simply "be referred to the stewards," who will then be able to decide what punishment is given.

    -------------------------

    So it will now be at the personal discretion of the stewards
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    FIA APPROVES CHANGES TO F1 2020 REGS, APPOINTS SUPPLIERS FOR 2021

    The World Motor Sport Council (WMSC) approves further changes to the 2020 regulations which has been conveyed by the FIA, while few suppliers for 2021 has been confirmed.

    The latest meet of WMSC is taking place in Paris which will end with the FIA Prize Gala. Ahead of the award ceremony, there were important decisions taken on the F1 side, especially with regards to the 2020 regulation changes.

    The council approved the changes to the 2020 FIA Technical and Sporting Regulations which pertains to making chequered flag as the definitive end-of-race signal after few issues this year in selected F1 races with the digital board used.

    In another bigger change, the F1 teams will now not be able to cover their cars during winter testing, which will be done to make it much more appealing to the media and also the fans. The winter testing is set to be showcased on Sky Sports and F1 TV again.

    Here are the list of changes approved:

    - Wording relating to the sampling and testing of fuel at the events to incorporate reference declarations
    - The reinstatement of the chequered flag as the definitive end-of-race signal
    - Wording to prevent teams from covering their cars during winter testing, in order to make these events more appealing to the media and fans
    - Minor corrections and adjustments to articles in both sets of Regulations

    Aside the 2020 changes, the FIA WMSC also confirmed the appointment of BBS as the single supplier of wheel rims starting from F1 2021, following its pre-selection on July 5, 2019. There was a consultation phase with some minor changes to the initial spec.

    There was also movement towards the final appointment of Magneti Marelli for the fuel primer pump and of Bosch for the high pressure fuel pump by the council. The pre-selection was made on July 30, 2019 after a phase of consultation.

    https://formularapida.net/fia-approv...iers-for-2021/
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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    Formula 1 relax 2020 engine restrictions

    Formula 1 has relaxed restrictions on engine usage for 2020 meaning drivers could suffer fewer grid penalties.

    Drivers will next year be able to use three MGU-Ks - a part of the hybrid system - one more than in 2019.

    The move brings the MGU-K into line with the other parts of the power-unit in terms of permitted usage.

    F1's complex, high-tech turbo-hybrid power-units are officially split into four parts for the purposes of the rules.

    In addition to the MGU-K, which recovers energy from the rear axle and redeploys all hybrid-generated electrical energy to the rear wheels, the other three are the internal combustion engine, the turbo and the MGU-H, the part of the hybrid system that recovers energy from the turbo.

    In 2020, drivers will be permitted to use three of each part during the season before becoming subject to grid penalties.

    In addition, the engines require an electronics control box and a battery, with two of each being permitted for a season.

    The change was confirmed in the 2020 rules, which were officially published on 4 December, after a meeting of the FIA World Council, motorsport's legislative body.

    No more hiding

    Among other minor tweaks, the chequered flag has been reinstated as the official signal of the end of the race.

    This follows a mix-up at this year's Japanese Grand Prix when a system error led to the official light panel at the start-finish line showing a chequered flag signal one lap before the end of the race.

    Although the drivers kept racing to the designated grand prix distance, the race result was declared one lap earlier as a consequence of the error.

    And teams will no longer be able to use screens in front of their garages to obscure views of their cars during testing.

    This is already banned at race meetings, but until now teams had blocked garages from sight in pre-season testing, mainly to stop other teams getting a view of their new designs.

    The restriction will be in force from 09:00 to 18:00 local time each day and the only exceptions are when the floor of the car is not fitted or during the recovery and repair of a car damaged in a crash.

    Pre-season testing in 2020 is on 19-21 and 26-28 February at Spain's Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya.

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/formula1/50668906
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

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