Thread: Scuderia Ferrari SF70H

  1. #2881
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    Quote Originally Posted by springfield View Post
    He never learns. It was same for the last few races. But come qualy they are nowhere. Let him talk, we'll let our results talk for us
    Easy boy... the man is simply setting a target for his team. Besides boys at Maranello won't be sitting still with this long summer break. As long as Renault doesn't deliver any upgrades that count, I don't see how Red Bull can suddenly overturn the situation with merely aero and chassis.

  2. #2882
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    So Rosberg now thinks Ferrari won't keep up with Mercedes for the rest of the 2017 season

    i really hope he gets to EAT his own words come last race in Abu Dhabi

  3. #2883
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    Quote Originally Posted by FerrariF60 View Post
    So Rosberg now thinks Ferrari won't keep up with Mercedes for the rest of the 2017 season

    i really hope he gets to EAT his own words come last race in Abu Dhabi
    Well, with our current car it's expected to have many difficulties against Merc in the following two races in Spa and Monza. However, i don't know how we can fare with out current car in COTA, Maleysia, Japan, Brazil and Abu Dhabi. Japan should suit us more, right? I also hope RB won't be a threat in the second half of the season.

  4. #2884
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormy View Post
    Well, with our current car it's expected to have many difficulties against Merc in the following two races in Spa and Monza. However, i don't know how we can fare with out current car in COTA, Maleysia, Japan, Brazil and Abu Dhabi. Japan should suit us more, right? I also hope RB won't be a threat in the second half of the season.
    Ferrari will come good in the next races even in spa n Monza.

    If penalty is on cards, then next two races is best tracks to take that.

  5. #2885
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    Quote Originally Posted by nani_s23 View Post
    But at earlier tracks, Vettel missed couple of pole positions even though car is strong. Sochi is one of them.
    For me this year vet is not at his best in quali, but in race craft he improved alot near to perfection.

    Where as Lewis has best car for seasons, also he has that edge over others drivers in quali say around 0.2ths.
    ??? We had a 1-2 at quali at Sochi and Lewis was half a second slower than Bottas there...

  6. #2886
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    Technical analysis – Hungarian GP

    The Hungarian GP marked the last race before Formula 1 switched its summer break mode on. The technicians did not fail to impress with their latest modifications, though. Sauber presented the visually biggest upgrade package, but Ferrari and Red Bull also introduced a raft of developments.

    11 races completed, a further 9 still to go. Formula One has already passed its midpoint of the 2017 season, but the new technical revamp for this championship means technicians have an enormous playground to fine-tune their masterpieces and exploits the limits of the regulation and find the last drops of performance.

    {Ferrari}

    Over the last GP weekend prior the Hungarian GP, Ferrari seemed to slip back in the development race against Mercedes and seemed to lose performance due to the latest restrictions imposed by FIA regarding the floor’s flexibility and oil burning. To dismiss the concerns, the Scuderia gave the answer with its latest development package which was more impressive then than the one of its arch rival Mercedes.

    The team brought a new bargeboard to Hungary. The previous version was a seemingly simpler version than the one used by for example Mercedes, Force India or McLaren-Honda. It has a slightly serrated vertical element which has only two cuts over against Force Inida’s bargeboard which is serrated into ten sections by nine vertical cuts. The new bargeboard was upgraded with a serrated horizontal plane which has three blades. It is, however, still much less serrated than the Mercedes’ multi-blade, highly serrated version.

    To support the new bargeboard, Ferrari also introduced two inlets to the frontal extension of the floor. The rear part of the floor was also improved. Instead of four slots, the upgraded one has six S-formed slots on the outer part of the floor.

    The team also modified its rear wing. It added more slots into the endplated of the wing which has now a total of six cuts. The previous version which was also raced at Silverstone during the British GP had only four slots.

    Ferrari tested a series of upgrades during the post-race test at the Hungaroring including a heavily modified diffusor and a new floor. The new diffusor which was first tested by Ferrari’s brightest junior talent Charles Leclerc on the first test day was equipped with a completely new, smaller and more curved middle-section. The new floor was a further updated version which the team introduced to the Hungarian GP. The engineers are keen on gaining back the downforce lost by the restriction regarding the floor’s flexibility which affected the SF70-H the most.

    Mercedes

    Mercedes only brought slight modifications to the Grand Prix it won last year with Lewis Hamilton behind the wheel.

    The upgrade affected the rear wing. After having raced the ‘spoon’ rear wing in the last couple of races, the Anglo-German team introduced a new, high-downforce solution for the slow, twisty circuit of the Hungaroring. It was derived from the one used at Monaco and Barcelona.

    Red Bull

    The energy drink-owned F1 team which suffered from correlation problems between its CDF, windtunnel and real track measurement brought another upgrade package to the slow-speed Hungarian circuit which usually highlights the strengths of its cars.

    The team introduced a slight modification to the front wing which went through many small changes over the last races. A new horn was developed which connects the endplate and the main plane. That was a requirement of FIA’s technical department after some rival teams spotted the outer part of the Red Bull’s front wing flattering in the high-speed corners of Silverstone.

    The mounting pillars of the mirrors were also upgraded. They sit now more outwards and are supported, interestingly, by two support pillars instead of one horn.

    Teams don’t usually modify the shape of their sidepods as it has too much of an effect on the aerodynamics of the rear of the car. If they feel need to change it, it is always part of a bigger, all-around, sweeping upgrade package. Red Bull did it in Hungary with its extensive development. The inlet of the sidepods was decreased in its cross section area.

    During the post-Hungarian GP testing, the team tried out a new diffusor. The upgraded one featured a very aggressively curved, three-element outer edge

    {Sauber}

    The Swiss team also introduced a series of upgrades to the 4381m long Hungarian circuit located just outside Budapest. In fact, the Sauber update was visually the most significant one in the entire paddock. In term of the aerodynamics, the updated C36-Ferrari was the B-spec car of the former one. The package included various additional and modified vanes, modified bargeboards and engine cover.

    The Hinwill-based squad went with its package so far that it also made changes to the sidepods. The former wave-like shaped lower edge was modified to a quarter-round which increased the inlet area in its cross section.

    The pillars and the housing of the rear mirrors were also modified. The previous pillars featured a 90-degree shape while the new ones are more linear and lean outwards.

    One of the most significant changes was the completely redesigned bargeboard. The main vertical element of the former one was a contiguous part while the new one features a serrated, six-element vertical plane. The trailing edge of the horizontal element was already a heavily serrated part which was further updated.

    The engine cover was also redesigned for the Hungarian round. As Sauber miscalculated itself with the cooling requirements for its contemporary car, the team added a new, secondary inlet to the upper part of the engine cover. It remains to be seen whether this solution makes appearance in cooler races or it is only required in high ambient temperatures.

    Renault

    Renault introduced a huge upgrade package at Silverstone which worked very well. It included a new floor which was only raced by Nico Hülkenberg, but Jolyon Palmer got the new one in Hungary, as well.

    The team did not hesitate with further experiment parts at the twisty Hungaroring. A new front wing arrived for the third and final practice. The new solution was equipped with a longer vane on its endplate and the upper edge of the endplates featured a small cut. However, the new front wing not raced, it is expected to return for further evaluation at Spa.

    Toro Rosso

    Toro Rosso introduced a rather interesting and spectacular horizontal element for its turning vane beneath the nose cone. The three-element vertical section has had a contiguous horizontal support plane so far which was totally redesigned for the Hungarian GP, though. Instead of the solo plane, a narrow panel connects the three vertical elements and eleven upcurved vanes sit on it.

    Toro Rosso also started working on the serration of the bargeboards. The previous version consisted of two elements. For Hungary, the engineers slotted the outer element.

    During the tests, the Faenza-based squad tried out an innovative secondary T-wing which connects to the lower part of the engine cover fin. It is placed in the same height as the middle part of the rear wing. The upper T-wing is a solo-plane configuration with a curvature in its middle section. The team might seek for ways to exploit the extra downforce from the T-wing, but reduce the induced drag.

    Smaller updates

    Force India updated its already very complex bargeborads. The enormous vertical element was already serrated into ten pieces. For the Hungaroring, the Silverstone-based squad modified the frontal part of the horizontal element, it features now five small vanes instead of a contiguous surface.

    McLaren-Honda introduced a refined T-wing. The Anglo-Japanese collaboration which pinned high hopes on the twisty high-downforce circuit of the Hungaroring has the most complex T-wing with its rival Williams team. The McLaren’s solution is a three-element one with a slot in each element. The highest and the middle element are equipped with a gurney flap to improve the separation of air.

    http://www.f1technical.net/news/21347
    #KeepFightingMichael | #CiaoJules

  7. #2887
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    Quote Originally Posted by DelMar View Post
    ??? We had a 1-2 at quali at Sochi and Lewis was half a second slower than Bottas there...
    I'm talking about other tracks where he missed pole by .1-2ths. he made mistakes at final corner or too aggressive coming from s1 where he cooked his tyres.

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    Vettel: Ferrari has identified weak areas of its 2017 F1 car

    Ferrari has identified the weak areas of its 2017 Formula 1 car and has a good understanding of how to address them to maintain its title challenge, says Sebastian Vettel.

    The Scuderia has produced its most competitive car in the V6 era this season, enabling it to challenge Mercedes for the constructors' championship with Vettel leading Lewis Hamilton in the drivers' standings.

    The two teams' form has ebbed and flowed throughout the season, with Ferrari coming out on top most recently at the tight-and-twisty Hungaroring before F1 paused for its summer break.

    That victory followed a run of races that suggested Mercedes had gained the upper hand in the development race, but Vettel said Ferrari knew what areas it needed to address to keep up its charge.

    "We've been competitive every track where we've gone," says Vettel.

    "It's true that Mercedes has here and there been more competitive and we were a little bit behind.

    "It's normal from track to track there's a bit of a difference.

    "For drivers, some tracks we like more than others so it's the same for the car.

    "It's normal it's up and down but that's not our target - we want to be the best on every track we go. That's not the case yet but we're working on it.

    "We have quite a good understanding of what the car needs.

    "Now we have the time to look into a couple of things with a bit more peace and calm and try to improve."

    Vettel praised Ferrari's efforts with this year's challenge and added it was a good sign that rivals were copying its ideas.

    "It's a fact to say in the last couple of years we didn't have the best car and it's a fact to say in the last couple of years we weren't the strongest in developing the car," he said.

    "If you look at the last three years, this year is a different story and we keep progressing.

    "We've brought a lot of bits, we've seen a lot of bits of people copying ours but that's a good sign.

    "It's testimony of good and hard work and the achievement that has gone into this project and we keep pushing flat-out."



    Ferrari's one-two in the Hungarian Grand Prix helped the team close to within 39 points of Mercedes in the constructors' standings with nine races to go.

    Vettel extended his lead over Hamilton to 14 points and is confident he and his team have the resources and capabilities to fight until the end.

    "The team is in much better shape this year and if you have the right results coming your way, you start to pick up some momentum," he said.

    "It's up to us to keep it going. I'm quite confident we have the right people.

    "We know how to build a strong car and we have improved the engine this year massively so everything is going in the right direction.

    "I'm confident we'll be there and fight for big points."

    http://www.autosport.com/news/report...its-weaknesses

  9. #2889
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    Analysis: The role of Pirelli testing in Ferrari's resurgence

    By: Adam Cooper, F1 Reporter


    Did taking part in Pirelli's test programme last year help Ferrari have an advantage over its rivals when it comes to managing this year's tyres? Adam Cooper seeks answers.

    Back in 2016, Ferrari, Mercedes and Red Bull took part in a special "mule car" test programme to help Pirelli with the development of its prototype wider tyres.

    They happened to be the three top teams of the current era, so with or without the rule changes it was inevitable that they would also remain the dominant forces in 2017.

    But did that test programme give Ferrari a crucial boost that has allowed the Italian team to take on Mercedes head-to-head this season – and helped Sebastian Vettel to hold the championship lead 11 races in?

    It’s obvious that Ferrari’s improved form has resulted from progress in all areas, with marginal gains adding up to overall upward progress.

    But tyres have clearly been a key element, and it’s apparent that Ferrari has usually enjoyed an edge on tyre management, certainly in the first part of the season – notwithstanding the issues at Silverstone, which were seemingly down to bad luck.

    How to make testing fair has been a perennial problem for Pirelli. When it started its original F1 development programme, it was able to ensure a level playing field by utilising the neutral Toyota TF109, handily available after the Japanese manufacturer pulled out of the sport.

    When that chassis had passed its sell-by date, Pirelli had to cast around for a more up-to-date car for 2012, and it settled on a Renault R30.

    That seemed like a suitable solution for the big guns – at the time the Enstone outfit was not a threat for race wins, having finished a distant fifth in the 2011 championship on 73 points. In effect, it was the team furthest down the order with the capability to run a test programme.

    In the hands of Lucas di Grassi and Jaime Alguersuari, that car ran five test sessions at Jerez, Spa, Barcelona and Paul Ricard in 2012, for a total of over 7000kms. Pirelli did its best to ensure parity by giving all the competitors reports and data from the tests.

    Nevertheless, some teams were concerned that the re-badged Lotus team would gain an advantage, even though its own drivers were not involved in the testing.

    The stats did little to allay those fears: from 73 points in 2011, Enstone scored 303 in 2012 and 315 in 2013. Was that just the Kimi Raikkonen effect, or had its involvement in testing, at a time when it was so restricted, given the team extra inside knowledge of the tyres?

    It was that sort of suspicion that Pirelli (and the FIA) desperately wanted to avoid when planning the test programme for the 2017 rules.

    The added complication was that the tyres would be wider and would have to deal with much higher downforce levels, so it wasn't just a question of bolting them onto an existing car.

    The solution was the "mule car" package: a 2015 chassis adapted for the wider tyres and with high downforce added to approximate the 2017 loadings. All teams were invited to tender, and not surprisingly the big three – Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull – agreed to take part.

    They each had the resources to build and run a special car during a season already made busy by preparations for the new rules. None of them wanted to be left out, because they all knew that taking part would confer some advantage. So why let a key rival steal a march?

    The workload was carefully split between the three, who were each given the same number of days and the same opportunity to try all the tyres in the range, plus wets, culminating in a final verification test in Abu Dhabi where all three cars would run.

    In conjunction with the FIA, Pirelli went to great lengths to ensure that the three teams did not gain an advantage over those not involved.

    The testing was "blind," with teams and drivers not told what they were getting. Data was shared between all teams, and rivals could send an observer to any test if they wanted to.

    Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing testing the new 2017 Pirelli tyres
    Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing testing the new 2017 Pirelli tyres
    Photo by: Pirelli
    The FIA also tried to ensure that running high downforce did not contribute directly to 2017 aero development by mandating that the mule car aero package did not reflect the new rules.

    "The point is the mule cars were developed avoiding any solution that could give an advantage to the teams," said Pirelli F1 boss Mario Isola.

    "So instead of developing the floor, the wings, and all the changes in the aero package of the current cars, they were obliged to use the skirts, old technology, and this kind of stuff.

    "I have also to remind you that all the data were available to all the teams. Also some data related to the set-up of the car, like weight distribution, aero distribution and mechanical balance, were included in the report.

    "All these data were available to all the teams, and the teams started to analyse the data, and tried to anticipate the tyres."

    One of the most intriguing aspects of the testing was the identity of the drivers. It was clear from very early on that Ferrari was using its race drivers to a greater extent than the other teams. That was a signal that Maranello, and in particular Sebastian Vettel, believed that there was something to be gained.

    Famously, Vettel was the only F1 driver to visit Pirelli's base and sound out the engineers during the build-up to the Italian company's return to the sport.

    He also showed his commitment in 2010 when he won the world championship in Abu Dhabi, flew to Europe for a whirlwind victory tour, and then returned to the Middle East to sample the new Pirellis for the first time.

    This is a man who, like countryman Michael Schumacher, leaves no stone unturned.

    Long after it became apparent that Ferrari had come to the conclusion that focussing on its race drivers was a good idea, Mercedes resolutely stuck to using Pascal Wehrlein, at that time a Manor driver.

    Pirelli tyres
    Pirelli tyres
    Photo by: XPB Images
    Towards the end of the year both Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg were asked if they thought they were missing out by not following Ferrari's example and doing the bulk of the testing. A shrug of the shoulders and puzzled look was the answer: amid their title battle, they didn't see the point.

    Both did get involved, although Rosberg's session was spoiled by rain, and Hamilton made only a token appearance before he felt unwell.

    Red Bull race drivers Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen also only appeared right at the end of the programme, having left the bulk of the work to Pierre Gasly and Sebastien Buemi.

    Pirelli's own figures for kilometres completed by each driver tell their own story:

    Driver Team Distance complete (km)
    Pascal Wehrlein Mercedes 3,248
    Pierre Gasly Red Bull 2,494
    Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 2,228
    Sebastien Buemi Red Bull 1,190
    Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 1,054
    Max Verstappen Red Bull 517
    Esteban Gutierrez Ferrari 480
    Antonio Fuoco Ferrari 478
    Nico Rosberg Mercedes 209
    Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull 200
    Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 50

    Fast forward to 2017, and Ferrari has not only been super competitive, but the SF70H has been consistent, with a wider operating window than its main rivals. The team has adapted to the new tyres with apparent ease, certainly compared with Mercedes.

    So did Ferrari gain more from the mule car testing, and if so, how?

    It appears that the team simply did a better job of learning from the high-downforce running, and transferring that knowledge into the development of the 2017 car.

    It's been suggested that the Ferrari mule car pushed the limits when it came to aero, and some elements did specifically help the team prepare for the new regs, despite the FIA attempting to stop that happening.

    Ferrari also used the mule car testing to properly correlate the Maranello wind tunnel for high downforce and wide tyres, something that both Mercedes and Red Bull have struggled with in the early part of this season.

    Then there's the question of the tyres themselves. As noted, the testing was blind, in that drivers were not given details about what had changed from test to test, or set to set. But they could follow the general trends.

    "With this big change in regulation, and this big change in our philosophy of making the tyres, they had the feeling of the direction at least," said Isola.

    "One of the comments which was common after each test – when we were testing the new prototypes, they didn't know we were testing new compounds or constructions – but when we were testing the new compounds the difference was so big in terms of not overheating, they could push on the new compound, they felt immediately.

    "When they finished the run all the drivers came back saying, 'Wow, we like these tyres, because I can push, I don't feel overheating, also if I overheat the tyre a little bit because of the sliding, I slow down a couple of corners, and the tyre is back.'

    "That was a comment that was quite common. And obviously we were looking for a tyre with these characteristics. So it is clear that we took that direction."

    Obviously, all drivers who took part in the testing, especially in the latter stages as the definitive 2017 specs emerged, could benefit from the running.

    But Vettel and, to a lesser extent, Raikkonen were involved pretty much all the way through, and thus they could properly follow the development path, and just possibly, direct it.

    Inevitably a driver of Vettel's calibre and experience must have an influence when he gets out of the car and says the equivalent of 'Eureka!' to the Pirelli engineers when he finds a tyre that is just so.

    No disrespect to the likes of Wehrlein or Gasly – the two drivers who did most of the testing for the other teams – but if you were Pirelli, whose opinion would you feel carried more weight?

    "The experience of a race driver who is a four-time world champion is obviously valuable, this is clear," said Isola. "A driver has sensations, feelings, when he drives a car.

    "In F1 we are lucky, we have a lot of sensors, so we can basically replicate or check if the feeling of the driver is in line. I think it's more related to experience, because Pascal for example was doing a very good job, he was always available, and giving us good feedback.

    "Sebastian is a professional driver, and when he was testing, after each run, he was giving us a lot of detailed information, his opinion on each set. 'I like this, I don't like that,' for this reason, that reason.

    "The other drivers did the same, and we also had some sort of form they had to fill in, to not forget any detail.

    "Obviously a driver is trying to push you in the direction of the tyre that he likes. When he was finding a tyre that he liked, it was, 'This is a good tyre, a nice tyre,' but the test was blind. So he doesn't know if at the end of the day if we selected the tyre that he liked or not."

    There's no doubt that all three teams attempted to use the testing to gain an advantage, and intriguingly Red Bull admits that it didn't work as planned.

    Christian Horner is adamant that Red Bull thought it had a handle on things and tailored the RB13 to suit, and then the spec of the tyres changed.

    "I think actually running the Pirelli mule car hurt us in a few ways," he said. "A few things changed late on with the tyres that we potentially were designing the car around, that then changed. I think that may have perhaps influenced our development direction.

    "I wouldn't say it backfired, but it definitely led us in a direction that wasn't conducive to the tyres that were ultimately nominated. The simple facts are that Mercedes and Ferrari did a better job of interpreting those regulations than we did over the winter."

    Horner may flag up Mercedes, but Toto Wolff is equally frustrated with the way the mule car testing panned out.

    He admits that it would have been better for Hamilton and Rosberg to have done more mileage - and while the German isn't racing this year, his input would still have been valid at the time.

    However, Wolff says it seemed logical not to distract them from their day jobs.

    "We were in the middle of that internal championship fight," said the Mercedes boss. "Where it's understandable that none of the drivers wanted to spend a lot of time looking at future technology and tyres, and rather focus on their own championship campaign. I think now in hindsight…

    "In F1 you very rarely find a silver bullet that is going to make all the difference. But it is about putting all the marginal gains. And maybe, and it's just a hypothesis, I don't know if it's true, Sebastian's credibility and feedback to Pirelli can have an impact.

    "And I don't think that the drivers would have particularly learned, but Pirelli's going to rely more on the results and on the feedback than from a junior driver. Having said that, we haven't got the data that supports that hypothesis."

    Nevertheless, it's an idea that he's happy to put out there. The likelihood is that the 2017 championship will be won by a few points, with a bad race here or there – such as Hamilton's in Monaco – proving decisive. If Vettel does stay in front, then those marginal gains will have proved their worth.

    https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/f...esting-921059/

  10. #2890
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    Its great what our team did.
    This article was written to say Ferrari cheated in testing, when you boil down to the essence.
    So, these people who write these articles must have selective memory, or some type of amnesia! They seem to have forgotten, MERCEDES tyre tested with a current car!!!!!!!!! And they solved their tyer issues!!!! No one bats an eyelid! Oh wait, I forgot, Mercedes is a british team, with a German engine! Yes, always what the the British teams do are correct, but not Ferrari!!!!

  11. #2891
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Its great what our team did.
    This article was written to say Ferrari cheated in testing, when you boil down to the essence.
    So, these people who write these articles must have selective memory, or some type of amnesia! They seem to have forgotten, MERCEDES tyre tested with a current car!!!!!!!!! And they solved their tyer issues!!!! No one bats an eyelid! Oh wait, I forgot, Mercedes is a british team, with a German engine! Yes, always what the the British teams do are correct, but not Ferrari!!!!
    Mercedes-Benz, British, you sure?
    CAVALLINO RAMPANTE PER SEMPRE

  12. #2892
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Its great what our team did.
    This article was written to say Ferrari cheated in testing, when you boil down to the essence.
    So, these people who write these articles must have selective memory, or some type of amnesia! They seem to have forgotten, MERCEDES tyre tested with a current car!!!!!!!!! And they solved their tyer issues!!!! No one bats an eyelid! Oh wait, I forgot, Mercedes is a british team, with a German engine! Yes, always what the the British teams do are correct, but not Ferrari!!!!
    motorsport.com had history to support whichever Lewis' team. This is one of many articles against Lewis rival. Although they managed to tune down their tone this time, but their intention to accuse "unfair" tyre testing was well written between the lines.
    I'm used to this kind of article and the only reason why I still acess their website because they still have lots of good journalists in their team (especially Giorgio Piola).

  13. #2893
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Its great what our team did.
    This article was written to say Ferrari cheated in testing, when you boil down to the essence.
    So, these people who write these articles must have selective memory, or some type of amnesia! They seem to have forgotten, MERCEDES tyre tested with a current car!!!!!!!!! And they solved their tyer issues!!!! No one bats an eyelid! Oh wait, I forgot, Mercedes is a british team, with a German engine! Yes, always what the the British teams do are correct, but not Ferrari!!!!
    Also Ferrari have suffered most tyre failures this season. What sort of tyre advantage is that?

  14. #2894
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Oh wait, I forgot, Mercedes is a british team, with a German engine!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob View Post
    Mercedes-Benz, British, you sure?

    Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains (previously known as Ilmor Engineering and Mercedes-Benz High Performance Engines) is a British Formula One engine manufacturer, owned by Mercedes-Benz.

    Ilmor was founded by Mario Illien and Paul Morgan in 1983, as an independent British Formula One engine manufacturer. The company name was taken from the surnames of the founders.

    Headquarters is located in Brixworth, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

    So in a way, both of you are right.....technically.

  15. #2895
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgonzalesm6 View Post
    Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains (previously known as Ilmor Engineering and Mercedes-Benz High Performance Engines) is a British Formula One engine manufacturer, owned by Mercedes-Benz.

    Ilmor was founded by Mario Illien and Paul Morgan in 1983, as an independent British Formula One engine manufacturer. The company name was taken from the surnames of the founders.

    Headquarters is located in Brixworth, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

    So in a way, both of you are right.....technically.
    as long as we all agree Ferrari is an Italian engine manufacturer, we are all good

  16. #2896
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    Mercedes F1 team is British team whit German cash.

  17. #2897
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    Mercedes-AMG are racing under a German flag, so yeah, it's a German team operating from the UK because of logistics. However, Lewis is racing for them so of course they won't say Lewis' team does suspicious things.
    Last edited by Stormy; 18th August 2017 at 14:56.

  18. #2898
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    Quote Originally Posted by theodorus8864 View Post
    Easy boy... the man is simply setting a target for his team. Besides boys at Maranello won't be sitting still with this long summer break. As long as Renault doesn't deliver any upgrades that count, I don't see how Red Bull can suddenly overturn the situation with merely aero and chassis.
    Actually the boys are not allowed to even be at the factory and have been on two weeks of R&R, they can use their minds, perhaps work at home, but thems the rules.
    President, Scuderia Ferrari Club of Denver - The Official Passion
    http://www.scuderiaferrari.club
    denver@scuderiaferrari.club

  19. #2899
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrndLkNatv View Post
    Actually the boys are not allowed to even be at the factory and have been on two weeks of R&R, they can use their minds, perhaps work at home, but thems the rules.
    correct. Nothing having to do with F1....shops closed and no emails with regards to F1.

  20. #2900
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    Quote Originally Posted by khizerk View Post
    Also Ferrari have suffered most tyre failures this season. What sort of tyre advantage is that?

  21. #2901
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    Quote Originally Posted by khizerk View Post
    Also Ferrari have suffered most tyre failures this season. What sort of tyre advantage is that?
    Kimi is the cause of most of the Ferrari tyre failures.

  22. #2902
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgonzalesm6 View Post
    correct. Nothing having to do with F1....shops closed and no emails with regards to F1.
    Who and how is that controlled?

  23. #2903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob View Post
    Mercedes-Benz, British, you sure?
    Well, it is a british team, it was Brawn, before it was Honda, before that it was British American Racing Honda, before that it was Tyrell, so it was all british, but just added Mercedes Benz name, the car is built in England, even the MB high performance engine fascility in England. So, I woukd say yes, its british with a german name!

  24. #2904
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefa View Post
    Who and how is that controlled?
    these 3 weeks off(complete shutdown) for all teams is per the FIA; it is their rule. I'm sure via personal/business phones, engineers and aero dept.'s do text or have coffee or

    have lunch given their family situation should they choose to text or have coffee/lunch with one another; but the shops are shutdown.

  25. #2905
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Well, it is a british team, it was Brawn, before it was Honda, before that it was British American Racing Honda, before that it was Tyrell, so it was all british, but just added Mercedes Benz name, the car is built in England, even the MB high performance engine fascility in England. So, I woukd say yes, its british with a german name!
    yes.....

    BAR(British American Racing) bought Tyrell's entry in 1998, but not their facilities, team, or staff. Started racing in 1999 with a Reynard chassis and Supertec (Renault) engines, and they finished dead last with zero points. Honda bought them out, including the BAR facility, in 2005. Honda bailed out after 2008, selling the team to Ross Brawn. The renamed Brawn team won the F1 championships in 2009, 11 years after their startup season.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_American_Racing

    The 2009 Brawn season was run on a shoestring and many of the former Honda staff were laid off after the cars were designed and built, so when Mercedes bought the Brawn team at the end of 2010, they had to rebuild again and took 4 years to reach championship success with both WDC and WCC titles.

  26. #2906
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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    Well, it is a british team, it was Brawn, before it was Honda, before that it was British American Racing Honda, before that it was Tyrell, so it was all british, but just added Mercedes Benz name, the car is built in England, even the MB high performance engine fascility in England. So, I woukd say yes, its british with a german name!
    Mercedes-Benz is German. They race under German flag, HQ is based in Germany. So, from now on, you want to call them Mercedes/Brawn/BAR etc etc. It doesnt matter who they bought or took over. End of the day Mercedes-Benz is, German. What national antem do they have played after they win? German.
    CAVALLINO RAMPANTE PER SEMPRE

  27. #2907
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    The meecedes benz is German with boring vehicles. The f1 team is completely English for my concepts. In English with most English engineers. When they will be in the team in most German engineers and the car will be made in the amg stutgard section then it will be German, but with one difference it will be the average team in f1 because the Germans themselves are not able to make a top car. Because of this, the ferrari is special. The car works in most Italian engineers in Italy even when it does not go all the way.

  28. #2908
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfaromeo View Post
    The meecedes benz is German with boring vehicles. The f1 team is completely English for my concepts. In English with most English engineers. When they will be in the team in most German engineers and the car will be made in the amg stutgard section then it will be German, but with one difference it will be the average team in f1 because the Germans themselves are not able to make a top car. Because of this, the ferrari is special. The car works in most Italian engineers in Italy even when it does not go all the way.
    I tend to think good engineers, like every other talent, know no borders. They are just good engineers from Italy, Germany, England, USA or anywhere (except of course Scotland)

  29. #2909
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    German team with British politics and ambition because the Brits cannot possibly build any good fast reliable car.
    Quote Originally Posted by alfaromeo View Post
    Mercedes F1 team is British team whit German cash.

  30. #2910
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    Judging by the upper posts four weeks is a really long and boring time

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