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Thread: 2018 Canadian GP - Race thread

  1. #481
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    He was not the only one to call Monaco and Canada boring.....
    Forza Ferrari

  2. #482
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greig View Post
    He was not the only one to call Monaco and Canada boring.....
    yes, but this is coming from a 4x WDC when in previous years he never called these races "boring." When he's in front and winning......they're not boring; when he's not in front they're boring!!!!

  3. #483
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    Feb 2015
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    symphony f1errari.png different drivers same car position driving thru the same place

  4. #484
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    Shame on Lewis for wanting to always win. Shame on Max for wanting the same. Fans want to see the tire colors changing after each pit and who can't finish on super, hyper softs. F=Pirelli is not about breaking WDC WCC records. Seb took pole and the win !! Kimi goes on to the next race without complaining. Leclerc is doing great. Max on podium leaving no mess behind. Forget about Lewis, if anyone should be complaining; it should be Alonso! He'd do better on foot than in his ride! BTW my crystal ball says Ferrari won the French GP !!

  5. #485
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    Vettel won 11 races with Ferrari. I hope there are more to come this season! But there could be so many more. VET/Ferrari could have won Australia 2016, Canada 2016, Singapore 2016, China 2017, Spain 2017, Singapore 2017, Malaysia 2017, China 2018, Azerbaijan 2018. That would be 20 races, if everything went perfect.

    But I know Ferrari could also have won less races.
    Last edited by coshida; 13th June 2018 at 09:16.

  6. #486
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    btw. Vettel led 207 laps this season. Hamilton only 90

  7. #487
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    Quote Originally Posted by coshida View Post
    btw. Vettel led 207 laps this season. Hamilton only 90
    Just shows how lucky Hamilton has been.

    Luckiest World Champion of all time - Lewis Hamilton
    Unluckiest World Champion of all time - Sebastian Vettel

  8. #488
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    Unluckiest World Champion of recent memory is probably Alonso, so close so many times

  9. #489
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    Quote Originally Posted by jragona View Post
    Unluckiest World Champion of recent memory is probably Alonso, so close so many times
    Yeah and Vettel cost him and Ferrari 2 titles. So Vettel must give us 2 titles back.

  10. #490
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    I won't start a new thread for this but Pirelli will bring the soft, supersoft and ultrasoft "special" tyres to Paul Ricard. That's a different range than for Barcelona which had the medium, soft and supersoft range. This means there will be a fourth "special" ver. 2.0 tyre, the ultrasoft. That brings it, right now, to 11 different dry compound tyres this year. The normal range of seven and four "special" ones. So instead of learning from the Barcelona mistake where Pirelli should, in hindsight, have brought the superhard and hard tyres to cancel the blistering they go even softer now for Paul Ricard. The end of the lap, 2nd and 3rd sectors will bring very hard load on the tyres, similar to Barcelona. I know the allocations were made weeks ago but there's always room for exemption if their is a risk of repeating what happened during the winter test in Barcelona. So for Paul Ricard with a little less stress on the tyres they should have gone for the hard, medium and then a gap to the supersoft tyre for qualifying. But if teams see blisters (with normal specs) in practice, here you go, the hard tyre and shut up!

    Anyway, Ferrari have split their strategy for Seb and Kimi. Seb has 1 soft, 3 supersoft and 9 ultrasoft tyres. Kimi has 2-2-9. Merc have gone the same with Lewis and Bottas. RBR has brought more softs and less ultrasofts.

  11. #491
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    Quote Originally Posted by 512 TR View Post
    I won't start a new thread for this but Pirelli will bring the soft, supersoft and ultrasoft "special" tyres to Paul Ricard. That's a different range than for Barcelona which had the medium, soft and supersoft range. This means there will be a fourth "special" ver. 2.0 tyre, the ultrasoft. That brings it, right now, to 11 different dry compound tyres this year. The normal range of seven and four "special" ones. So instead of learning from the Barcelona mistake where Pirelli should, in hindsight, have brought the superhard and hard tyres to cancel the blistering they go even softer now for Paul Ricard. The end of the lap, 2nd and 3rd sectors will bring very hard load on the tyres, similar to Barcelona. I know the allocations were made weeks ago but there's always room for exemption if their is a risk of repeating what happened during the winter test in Barcelona. So for Paul Ricard with a little less stress on the tyres they should have gone for the hard, medium and then a gap to the supersoft tyre for qualifying. But if teams see blisters (with normal specs) in practice, here you go, the hard tyre and shut up!

    Anyway, Ferrari have split their strategy for Seb and Kimi. Seb has 1 soft, 3 supersoft and 9 ultrasoft tyres. Kimi has 2-2-9. Merc have gone the same with Lewis and Bottas. RBR has brought more softs and less ultrasofts.
    So Ferrari banking on one lap pace. RBR focused on race pace & tyre strategy.
    If Ferrari can find that right set-up then it will be good. Main thing vettel need to quali ahead of ham that’s imp. Rest RB guys will take care of ham.

  12. #492
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    Jun 2012
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    Paul Ricard is an incognito, Mercedes aren’t going to have its usual advantage of using harder tires; in my view this is what’s happening on this championship:

    Ferrari can put the softer tires quicker on the right window, Mercedes can put only harder tires on the right window quickly (quicker than Ferrari, remember Bahrain, Spain, etc); Ferrari has a little more degradation than Mercedes.

    Red Bull can put softer tires into window as quickly as Ferrari. Their degradation is a nick better than Mercedes. RB is impaired by Renault, this year their chasis is great. Their aero we don’t really know yet, maybe this race and next will be the test of their aero and short vs large philosophy.

    So we shouldn’t be as bad as Spain in France, we will have a chance with softer tires.

    BTW there where 3 races for Pirelli 2018 2.0, Spain, France, England. From the start of the 2.0 tires decision.

    Forza Ferrari !







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    Go Ferrari, beat them all!

  13. #493
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    Mar 2018
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    Madagascar
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    Mercedes had their engines fully dialled up for the Canadian Grand Prix, after being forced to postpone the roll-out of their updated the second version of their 2018 power unit which was expected to break cover in Montreal.

    With the older engines bolted to the back, Mercedes took a calculated risk despite the mileage on the six engines used by the Silver Arrows and cranked them up for the occasion.

    Mercedes chief strategist James Vowles revealed, “All six power units, that’s across Force India, Williams and ourselves, made it to the end of that sequence without any significant issues. So we’re a third of the way through that season on the first power unit, and that in itself is an incredible achievement.”

    In the end, it was a bittersweet afternoon at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve as Valtteri Bottas was able to finish second, although Lewis Hamilton made it home in fifth, the reigning world champion had non-engine related cooling problems during the race.

    Vowles continued, “In terms of what happened in the race with Valtteri and Lewis, both of them drove the power unit as they did in the first race, there was no additional management, no additional switches, or modes or turn-downs, we were effectively using the power unit to its full benefit.”

    “What happened with Lewis was an entirely unrelated chassis cooling event, nothing to do with the engine itself. And you saw with Valtteri he was able to use it with good effect, second in qualifying and maintaining that second in the race.”

    Hamilton admitted after the race that he expected to stop at any point during the grand prix, but he soldiered on and the expected breakdown never came.

    Vowles explained, “We had on the chassis side a cooling issue that appeared very, very early on in the race, it appeared during the safety car and what it meant was the power unit was becoming very, very warm.”

    “We tried a number of countermeasures, both through switch changes that Lewis was able to complete for us, and through driving style, so Lewis was really adapting to the situation as best he could, to stabilise and keep the temperatures under control.”

    “He was around two seconds behind Max [Verstappen], he wasn’t tucked up behind him. We were getting a reasonable amount of clean air into the radiators. Lewis did a good job, and we were able to get somewhere reasonable in the first stint of the race, but we were still too warm.”

    “During the first pitstop we came in and we made an adjustment to try to alleviate and relieve the situation as much as possible. We knew that we had various elements in our cooling configuration that are removable. During a pit stop we can make a change. There are two losses here, the first is that during a pit stop itself you’re asking the guys to do a fairly complex job in a short space of time. Remember, the pit stop really only lasts around 2.0-2.2 seconds.

    “The second is that the car, as it goes back on track again, is in a slightly different aerodynamic configuration, simply because panels that were there have been removed.

    “The pitstop itself, how much slower was it? Actually, the effect was largely negligible. It was a few milliseconds, and up to a tenth really. The guys did a fantastic job, and by the time the guns came back on to put the wheels back on again, they were removing their hands from the car.

    “How much slower was the car out on track? The reality behind that was it was a matter of a few milliseconds from what we did with the cooling change, but more importantly, it gave us the ability to use more of the power unit performance and gave Lewis a car that now wasn’t struggling like it was in the first stint of the race, so he could now go back and attack others. And that performance benefit outweighs anything that happened on the cooling side.

    “As Lewis went back out it was a little bit more comfortable, and you saw later on in the race he was able to bring the fight to [Daniel] Ricciardo. Just, unfortunately, the damage was done far too early in terms of his race performance, which just meant fifth was all we could get from him on the day,” concluded Vowles.

    Now Mercedes are expected to unleash their next-gen update to their power units in time for Formula 1’s much-anticipated return to the high-speed Paul Ricard Circuit for the French Grand Prix weekend.

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