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Thread: 2019 F1 news/rumours

  1. #91
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    T minus 30 days to go till testing.
    It's not how start but how you finish.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinmay View Post
    The Vettel qualifying benchmark Leclerc must respond to

    https://in.motorsport.com/f1/news/ve...spond/4325188/

    The first challenge for Leclerc is to match or beat Vettel in qualifying, the stats aren't too promising for Leclerc, even though he is good, it won't be easy to beat your teammate who is the king of qualifying.
    Did I understood that right, Seb was best qualifier and Charles was worst?

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimiBot View Post
    Did I understood that right, Seb was best qualifier and Charles was worst?
    Very difficult to understand how Vettel a WDC champion can be already compared with Charles. Give our new boy a chance in his new seat of all seats to show what he can do. If Seb is the King of Qualifying, what should fans call Lewis?

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    Quote Originally Posted by KimiBot View Post
    Did I understood that right, Seb was best qualifier and Charles was worst?
    Charles wasn't the worst, he did well but he need to do even better as this time around, he has to beat Seb who was the best qualifier last year instead of Ericsson. But I think Charles will rise up to the challenge and Seb will also look to fend him off, I think we are in for a cracker.

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    ferrari not working on the tyre rim exploit like merc and rb are doing i have a feeling is going to bite us in the butt when it comes to tyre wear and tyre peak windows
    hockenheim 2018 / China 2018 : Never forget how quick Ferrari can lose it all, be humble.
    Positivity doesn't win you championships, whining about people being negative makes you blind!
    lol ignore the bitter old cows ;-)

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    Alfa-Sauber's official launch date letter

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dxc8bc_XcAI0uh_.jpg
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  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgonzalesm6 View Post
    Alfa-Sauber's official launch date letter

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dxc8bc_XcAI0uh_.jpg
    i hope they become permanent top 10 car this year lol then mercs wont have FI do all there dirty bidding to help ham like last year, they will have to deal with alfa
    hockenheim 2018 / China 2018 : Never forget how quick Ferrari can lose it all, be humble.
    Positivity doesn't win you championships, whining about people being negative makes you blind!
    lol ignore the bitter old cows ;-)

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwk360 View Post
    ferrari not working on the tyre rim exploit like merc and rb are doing i have a feeling is going to bite us in the butt when it comes to tyre wear and tyre peak windows
    How is it gonna affect tyre wear? And from where you got the information that Ferrari not working on a solution like Mercedes? Do tell us genius.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tifosi1993 View Post
    How its gonna affect tyre wear? And from where you got the information that Ferrari not working on a solution like Mercedes? Do tell us genius.
    By having a Mercedes style wheel rim increases the surface area, which helps to cool the tier when it gets hot, so it helps to keep the tire in the optimal temperature and helps prevent blisters I dont know how he knows that Ferrari is not working on it, but it can effect, but maybe Ferrari has another plan, they had decent tire wear last year, not as good as Red Bull though.

  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by tifosi1993 View Post
    How is it gonna affect tyre wear? And from where you got the information that Ferrari not working on a solution like Mercedes? Do tell us genius.
    https://thesportsrush.com/red-bull-o...sign-for-2019/

    was reading that, not 100% ferrari wont use it but no sign they will lol also stop being butthurt over nothing its a new year

    -_0_-
    hockenheim 2018 / China 2018 : Never forget how quick Ferrari can lose it all, be humble.
    Positivity doesn't win you championships, whining about people being negative makes you blind!
    lol ignore the bitter old cows ;-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by mardyrt View Post
    By having a Mercedes style wheel rim increases the surface area, which helps to cool the tier when it gets hot, so it helps to keep the tire in the optimal temperature and helps prevent blisters I dont know how he knows that Ferrari is not working on it, but it can effect, but maybe Ferrari has another plan, they had decent tire wear last year, not as good as Red Bull though.
    Construction wise, next year's Pirelli's going to be different, so different tyre temperature cycle. Not sure how 2018 Mercedes wheel rim design gonna work with 2019 tyre compounds. And as you said, Red Bull had by far, the best tyre wear of all so it's not like Mercedes solution is some kind of must-have gizmo that Ferrari need to copy.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwk360 View Post
    https://thesportsrush.com/red-bull-o...sign-for-2019/

    was reading that, not 100% ferrari wont use it but no sign they will lol also stop being butthurt over nothing its a new year

    -_0_-
    "Ferrari not working on the tyre rim exploit like merc and rb are doing i have a feeling is going to bite us in the butt when it comes to tyre wear and tyre peak windows" so you were 99.9% sure.

    "Stop being butthurt", "Gonna bite us in the butt"...it seems you have a rather unhealthy fascination with people's butt!



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    Turrini: The Ferrari technicians who are working on the 2019 car are cautiously optimistic (data showing are positive) So why cautiously?

    Because of the new regulations. Ferrari think they identified the right solutions but they don‘t know what RB and Mercedes have in store
    FERRARI FOR EVER !!!!!!!

  14. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwk360 View Post
    i hope they become permanent top 10 car this year lol then mercs wont have FI do all there dirty bidding to help ham like last year, they will have to deal with alfa
    I wish the same !! Big time !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brembo View Post
    I wish the same !! Big time !!
    chances of it happening is almost impossible but i soooo badly want in 2019 to get a podium of ferrari 1 - 2 and alfa P3 lol, and if it could happen it must happen at monza awww man that would be so insane
    hockenheim 2018 / China 2018 : Never forget how quick Ferrari can lose it all, be humble.
    Positivity doesn't win you championships, whining about people being negative makes you blind!
    lol ignore the bitter old cows ;-)

  16. #106
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    It looks like it is going to be yet another PU year. RedBull will win and challenge IF the HONDA PU is up on power and reliability. Mercedes will dominate IF they added more power to their PU and have the usual tank reliability. Ferrari can win IF they match or surpass Mercedes on power and do not flop mid season like last year. Chassis wise I liked the fact that we had 3 teams challenging on different tracks even though the Ferrari seemed to adapt to all tracks especially during the first half of the season.

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    Ferrari has not won a Formula 1 title in the past 10 seasons. But for the fact that the team has a history of lean spells between its glory years - notably the 15 fallow campaigns between its 1983 and '99 constructors' successes - you'd reckon it unthinkable for a team of this size and fame to go so long without clinching the ultimate prize.

    But Ferrari is a uniquely challenging beast.

    The recent decision to axe Maurizio Arrivabene from his role of team principal after four campaigns, with former chief technical officer Mattia Binotto replacing him, is the price for a relative lack of success. It was the right decision, for it wasn't simply the lack of results that did for Arrivabene, but the impact he had on the team. Leading a title-contending grand prix operation is never easy, but arguably it is harder at Ferrari than anywhere else, and Arrivabene's leadership qualities proved not to be compatible with the unique pressures at Maranello.

    Mercedes is now the team Ferrari once was - a tight-knit, ferocious race-winning machine that has enjoyed five consecutive double world championship successes. To knock Mercedes, and star driver Lewis Hamilton, off their perch has been within Ferrari's reach for the past two campaigns.

    But never has the phrase 'so near and yet so far' seemed so appropriate because, while Ferrari pushed Mercedes close in both 2017 and '18, in the final reckoning it was a long way off after slumps in the closing stages of both contests.

    So what must Ferrari do to bridge that gap and make the step from being a thorn in Mercedes' side to defeating it? It's clear that there's no need for a revolution, but in his new role Binotto must focus on several key areas that, collectively, could help get the job done.
    Ease the pressure

    This is easier said than done, but what was clear was that outgoing team principal Arrivabene's leadership style was based more on piling on pressure and allowing a culture of blame to emerge.

    This is an inadequate approach to get the best out of an F1 team, populated mostly with highly motivated and intelligent people, and is often the approach taken by a second-rater put in such a position. There will always be pressure, but the team culture - and the team boss in particular - can alleviate it.

    New team principal Binotto is one of those highly motivated and intelligent individuals, and has shown during his successful spell as chief technical officer that he can get the best out of a team of people. There's every chance that Binotto can do this while in charge of the whole operation. Last year, he was asked by Autosport about how he had turned around the technical department, and his response reveals a little of what he's about.

    "I think it's fair to say that our team, in terms of individuals, is very strong," said Binotto.

    Everyone makes mistakes - the biggest of all is for leadership not to recognise that and multiply the errors by thinking otherwise

    "We've got very high skills; it's a fantastic team in that respect, whatever areas. And from the power unit to the chassis and to the aero. I think what we're benefiting from in the last seasons is certainly stability in terms of the organisation, which in F1 is very important, because through the stability somehow you may start to set down a way of working, improve your procedures, your internal process.

    "I think, relative to myself, I'm certainly not an expert in all the areas. Twenty-five years of experience in F1; great time with Ferrari at the race track in the time of Michael Schumacher, but always as a power-unit man.

    "When I grew up in that final role I think what for me was important was to set the objectives and to make sure that the people were comfortable in their role, understood the internal process and worked better not only as individuals but as a team.

    "And where we've focused all the effort is, I think, to make sure that the team was working properly as a team, and forgetting about the individuals. And that's why, again, I think we are thinking about the car as a full package, and not try to split down in terms of different components or units, because we are a team and what is running is not a power unit or a wing but a full car.

    "So, again, all the effort was to build the team as a team and set the right objectives, deal with them, try to be ambitious. I think that's somehow what happened in the last two years."

    The elimination of a blame culture is essential. Sometimes, including in certain F1 teams, this objective is misinterpreted as not encouraging the isolation of problem areas. What it actually represents is the knowledge by individuals that they can highlight problems or mistakes, even if of their own making, with confidence that the focus will be on correcting them rather than issuing blame.

    Everyone makes mistakes - the biggest of all is for leadership not to recognise that and multiply the errors and the politics by thinking otherwise.
    Do not focus only on results

    This might sound counter-intuitive, but strong results are the consequence of a focus on sound processes and resisting the temptation to overreach.

    Yes, there are times when you can choose to be a little more aggressive or slightly more conservative according to the competitive situation, but F1 teams are at their best when they rely on good decision-making and working practices.

    Technically, Ferrari has been very impressive in recent years, producing a strong car in 2017 that was particularly good on slower tracks, then building on that in '18 with a machine that was stronger on a wider range of circuits. This suggests that, fundamentally, it is on the right path technically.

    Where things went wrong last year was with upgrades after the Italian Grand Prix, where the team gave off the air of overreaching itself. Not only did the parts not improve matters, but they sometimes made the car less competitive (falling back not just from Mercedes, but down towards Red Bull), and they were also a distraction.

    Exactly why these errors, related to the sealing of the floor among other problems, were made is not clear. But there's every chance it was down to the pressure of the title fight and the need to catch up with Mercedes in the points. Mercedes, meanwhile, redoubled its efforts based on the practices and processes that had won it the previous four titles and was rewarded.

    Sometimes teams overreach. This was emphasised at Suzuka when a ridiculous gamble was made in qualifying to send both Ferraris out in Q3 on wet-weather tyres on a dry track.

    Ultimately, it didn't prove too costly, but sometimes you have to accept that your best is only good enough for second, and make sure you don't risk dropping further back with a futile roll of the dice. If Ferrari focuses on getting the best out of what it's got, something it was good at in the first half of last season, this will stand it in good stead.
    Get the best out of Vettel

    Sebastian Vettel rightly drew plenty of criticism for his string of errors in 2018, which at the very least cost him the chance to take the title much closer to the wire than he did. He has to carry some of that responsibility, but drivers do not exist in a vacuum, and increasingly he had the air of a man carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders in a team that was losing control operationally.

    He is an emotional character - during Vettel's Red Bull pomp, race engineer Guillaume Rocquelin was exceptionally good at keeping his charge focused during races. Vettel would still complain over the radio, but during this period this was turned into an effective way to vent. At times last season, the Ferrari environment seemed to lack the pressure-relief valve Vettel needed.

    In an interview for an upcoming edition of The Autosport Podcast, former Ferrari test driver Luciano Burti, who still follows grand prix racing very closely in his role as a television commentator, suggested the team could have done more to get Vettel back on track after his disastrous crash while leading the German Grand Prix.

    Nobody doubts that Leclerc has already reached a high level in F1 and will perform well for Ferrari, but the team has to be adaptable to how effective he is early on

    "It was a really tiny mistake, which happens, and he was unlucky it happened in the wrong time and the wrong place and had a big consequence," said Burti.

    "From then on, I really think that someone like Jean Todt [the FIA president was Ferrari team principal from 1993-2007] would give him good feedback. I think Vettel felt maybe on his own to fight back from his mistake.

    "Once you have that pressure, if you say as a racing driver, 'I cannot make a mistake on the next lap or the next corner', you make a mistake. Once I think about it, that's it. I think that's what happened to him. Although he's a great champion, he's too human and when you have those feelings it doesn't do you any good.

    "He was on his own and someone like Jean would have made the difference to put him back on track, because it's not normal to see a four-time champion make so many mistakes, and silly mistakes sometimes."

    This does not mean Vettel can't take any blame for what happened, but any team must operate to get the most out of its star driver. They all have their idiosyncrasies and are at their best in the right environment. If Binotto can make Ferrari into a more rational, studious and calm operation - very much in his own image - then Vettel could be back to his crushing best.

    Many have assumed Vettel is now a busted flush in F1. It's possible that he is, but he didn't win four world championships for nothing, and some of his performances in the first half of last season were exceptional. Get Vettel in the right operating window, and much of the points gap to Mercedes and Lewis Hamilton last season would have been eliminated.
    Let Leclerc have his chance

    For all Vettel's troubles last year, he does go into the 2019 season as Ferrari's team leader and title hope. But that does not mean, actually must not mean, that newly promoted team-mate Charles Leclerc is not given his head.

    Leclerc has shown himself equal to every challenge thrown at him during his racing career, but the 21-year-old faces a bigger test than ever before by being thrown into the pressure-cooker environment of Ferrari for only his second year in F1. It was the right decision by Ferrari after Leclerc excelled at Sauber but, just as the team must ensure it gets the most from Vettel, the same applies to Leclerc.

    Even at the end of last season there was evidence that Ferrari was working hard to ensure it does just that, with engineer Jock Clear confirming in November that he'd be working with Leclerc.

    "I have a lot of experience with young drivers and a lot of experience with experienced drivers as well," said Clear.

    "With Charles coming in I'll help in any way I can to make his life easier, to ease some of the pressure, to make sure we get the best out of Charles and out of the team as a whole over the next few years."

    Nobody doubts that Leclerc has already reached a high level in F1 and will perform well for Ferrari, but the team has to be adaptable to how effective he is early on. It must not fear the possibility that he could outperform Vettel, but should also accept that he will likely need time to adapt to life in a top team and that he must be allowed to work towards fulfilling his prodigious potential.

    What it must not do is simply cast him as a number two from the off. Ferrari has made the right call and backed a young driver with serious ability, so it must be willing to make the most of him - and if necessary deal with the resulting fallout if it upsets the balance of power in a team Vettel has led for four years.
    Be willing to make the tough decisions

    One of the starkest contrasts between the management of Mercedes and Ferrari last season was the approach to team orders. While the concept of team orders is understandably a source of fury for many fans, it is sometimes a necessary evil for teams.

    At last year's Russian Grand Prix, Mercedes boss Toto Wolff ordered Hamilton past Valtteri Bottas because of the threat of Vettel behind. In the final reckoning, it wasn't necessary but at the time it was a valid move.

    Wolff didn't like making that decision and, if anything, had been a little indecisive by suggesting pre-race that it wouldn't happen, in the hope that such an unusual situation wouldn't materialise. But when it came to the crunch, he made the difficult call.

    At Ferrari, Arrivabene seemed unwilling to do this. At Monza, it was deemed to be Vettel's turn to go ahead of Kimi Raikkonen on the final run of qualifying, ultimately giving Raikkonen a tow and the boost he needed to take pole position. This put Vettel on a direct course to his clash with Hamilton on the opening lap, a moment that marked the turning point in the title battle. There was also hesitancy in the German Grand Prix to order Raikkonen to let Vettel past after Vettel had made a pitstop - a needless reticence, given they were on offset strategies at that moment.

    Arrivabene had a strange attitude to the media, with his offish attitude towards it suggesting a genuine fear

    In a tight title fight, clarity of thinking in such situations can make a decisive difference in the outcome. While Binotto should not allow a situation like the 2002 Austrian Grand Prix to arise - an egregious misuse of team orders - there must be a willingness to make the tough decisions.

    And that doesn't just mean that Ferrari should help Vettel, for if Leclerc were to be the better performer then there must be a willingness to cast even a multiple world champion as the support act should the need arise.

    Comparisons to the Todt era are unavoidable, and one characteristic of his leadership was a refusal to care what the outside world thought. He made decisions for the good of the team. The new management must not cower from such tough choices.
    Work better with the media

    This sounds like a very self-serving suggestion given that Autosport is a publication that specialises in motorsport journalism, but interacting with the media is important.

    Arrivabene had a strange attitude to the media, with his offish attitude towards it suggesting a genuine fear. In particular, there was too much concern about what the Italian media was saying.

    When Ross Brawn joined Ferrari, he stopped the practice of newspapers and newspaper cuttings being shared with all departments within Maranello, to eliminate the outside pressure and ensure greater focus internally.

    Keeping the media happy should not be an objective for a team, but it is of value, both in terms of playing the paddock political games and also communicating to your team members.

    F1 teams today are massive, and it's impossible to have the kind of relationship between the leadership and staff that you'd hope for. As such, many people inside the teams will consume the media not just to understand the wider storylines of grand prix racing, but also what's going on inside their own operations.

    It's also a good way to solidify the culture of your organisation. At Mercedes, Wolff's public comments on what his team are doing generally match what's happening internally and underpin a culture not built on fear and reprisals, but collaboration and communication.

    An F1 team can use its public comments to its advantage, which is what Ferrari must do.
    Don't change too much

    Ferrari doesn't need a revolution in order to beat Mercedes. Since its faltering start to the V6 hybrid turbo era it has generally been on an upward curve, with the technical changes in 2016 particularly important.

    It has good personnel, a proven record for producing competitive cars, a multiple world champion driver and one of the hottest young talents grand prix racing has seen in recent times, a big budget, and a capacity to win races in a tight battle with a formidable opponent.

    Elite sport these days is all about the aggregation of marginal gains and, with most of the fundamental building blocks in place, the priority should be to make small improvements where possible and ensure the culture is right to maximise the team's potential.

    Do that, and Ferrari's title drought may be about to end.

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  18. #108
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    Very reasoned article IMO and it makes a lot of sense, let's hope the advice is taken on board.

  19. #109
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    Good article and thanks for posting. But I don't agree with "Vettel will go into the 2019 season as Ferrari's team leader and title hope" statement. First of all Leclerc isn't Raikkonen (or Webber), he isn't a 36+ year old veteran who's pretty much at the end of his career. Leclerc is young and hungry and he is proven to be extremely talented and fast. Ferrari could've easily promoted him to Haas or kept him for another year at Sauber, but they didn't. They gave him the Ferrari seat, and it is reasonable to assure that, they did what they did because they are not as confident with Vettel as they used to.

  20. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by tifosi1993 View Post
    Good article and thanks for posting. But I don't agree with "Vettel will go into the 2019 season as Ferrari's team leader and title hope" statement. First of all Leclerc isn't Raikkonen (or Webber), he isn't a 36+ year old veteran who's pretty much at the end of his career. Leclerc is young and hungry and he is proven to be extremely talented and fast. Ferrari could've easily promoted him to Haas or kept him for another year at Sauber, but they didn't. They gave him the Ferrari seat, and it is reasonable to assure that, they did what they did because they are not as confident with Vettel as they used to.
    ^this.....i could NOT agree with you more on your statement....LeClerc is a fast and consistent driver (given the supreme records he's had in F3 and F2....or GP2 as they used to call it) and if Ferrari will treat them both equally from the get GO, i personally think he'll give Vettel a good run for his money....

    also first and foremost i'm a Ferrari Fan, i root for Ferrari to win the WCC......as drivers come an go....but i would LOVE to see LeClerc school the FAKE 4WDC Vettel.....common Vettel is an OK'ish driver (but really prone to making mistakes when under pressure), but anyone with half decent speed and talent could have won those WDC's in those rochetships Newey built for him....Hec*, even mark webber the pensioneer had the best shot at winning hte WDC in 2010, if it wasn't for his mistake in Korea, and then the inevitable when he "brushed" the wall in abu dhabi and had to come in for an early unsheduled stop.....

    but all that is history of course....i still love to see Seb's rear end get schooled by young LeClerc.....ha, ha...
    ...the new SF90 in the MATTE RED, to me it looks amazing. Let's hope it's gonna be as FAST as it looks.


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    Quote Originally Posted by FerrariF60 View Post
    ^this.....i could NOT agree with you more on your statement....LeClerc is a fast and consistent driver (given the supreme records he's had in F3 and F2....or GP2 as they used to call it) and if Ferrari will treat them both equally from the get GO, i personally think he'll give Vettel a good run for his money....

    also first and foremost i'm a Ferrari Fan, i root for Ferrari to win the WCC......as drivers come an go....but i would LOVE to see LeClerc school the FAKE 4WDC Vettel.....common Vettel is an OK'ish driver (but really prone to making mistakes when under pressure), but anyone with half decent speed and talent could have won those WDC's in those rochetships Newey built for him....Hec*, even mark webber the pensioneer had the best shot at winning hte WDC in 2010, if it wasn't for his mistake in Korea, and then the inevitable when he "brushed" the wall in abu dhabi and had to come in for an early unsheduled stop.....

    but all that is history of course....i still love to see Seb's rear end get schooled by young LeClerc.....ha, ha...

    Guess that would make Hamilton a FAKE 5WDC. Even Bottas was quick in those Mercedes rocketships.
    I do hope Leclerc will do well and think he will. But I don't think Vettel is such a slouch. Hopefully he becomes a good teacher to the young student and gets his 5th WDC this year. Next few years can belong to Leclerc and after maybe a Schumi dynasty again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silent Bob View Post
    Guess that would make Hamilton a FAKE 5WDC. Even Bottas was quick in those Mercedes rocketships.
    I do hope Leclerc will do well and think he will. But I don't think Vettel is such a slouch. Hopefully he becomes a good teacher to the young student and gets his 5th WDC this year. Next few years can belong to Leclerc and after maybe a Schumi dynasty again.
    Vettel was outclassed by Hamilton both in 2017 and 18. You can say whatever you like or make as many excuses as possible but it's not gonna change the fact that Hamilton is better driver. And you talk about rocketship, but Hamilton still managed to win races and championship when he didn't have a dominant car under his disposal. Also Hamilton had Alonso, Button and Rosberg as his teammates, much tougher opponent than Raikkonen or Webber. And we all know the story when Vettel was paired with a driver younger than him, he was soundly beaten. And Vettel never won a single race from starting outside P3.

    And you can dream about his 5th title as much as you want, but the thing is, it's not gonna happen unless Ferrari pulls a Newey and give him a rocketship. And even then he has to deal with Leclerc. And if both Ferrari and Mercedes turn out to be equal in terms of pace, then I am afraid Vettel gonna get schooled by Hamilton, again.

    Leclerc is Ferrari's future and hope, that's why they hired him. He will prove to be more than a match for Vettel, who wasted immense potentials of championship worthy cars like SF70-H and SF71-H.

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    Two idiots above think anyone can win in Red Bull of 2010-2013. Then tell me why didn't Webber finish at least second in any championship? Surely a bad driver can also finish 2nd in a rocketship? Do I also need to post that quote from McLaren's very own engineer who said in 2012 that in 2011 they[McLaren] had the best car and yet Vettel was beating him and went on to say that there is no trickery on cars, Vettel is simply better than Hamilton.

    Some fools need to be reminded about Vettel's 9 win streak which their boy Hamilton couldn't achieve all his career despite driving the most dominant F1 car of all time since 2014.

    It is well known and backed by stats that McLaren was 0.2s/lap quicker than Red Bull in 2012, what happened? Hamilton lost by almost 100 points and Vettel had just 1 less failure than Ham, in case some delusional guy brings up reliability.

    When Button and Ham were teammates together from 2010 to 2012, Button scored more points than Hamilton. Got beaten by Rosberg as well, Bottas also beats him regularly in first half before they tune the car more to Hamilton's liking, happened twice in 2017 and 2018, accepted by both Wolff and Lauda.

    Hamilton is way too overrated, when Vettel is on song, I can clearly see Hamilton sobbing beside his car like Germany qualifying or getting rattled after overtaken by Seb in Austria or getting an overtaking lesson by Seb on tracks like Australia[2017].

    Also, I see one noob mention the fact that Vettel is not good under pressure.

    Brazil 2012, Abu Dhabi 2012 come to my mind, when under title pressure, you find yourself at the back of the grid and charge to 3rd to grab title. Nice try but epic fail. Vettel is one of the best ever under pressure.

  24. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinmay View Post
    ...Useless garbage and blah blah blah...
    Boy, you got more excuses than a pregnant Nun. The fact is Vettel wasted championships worthy Ferrari cars and got his rare end handed to him by Hamilton. And we all saw how he handles pressure, three races in a row in fact.

  25. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by tifosi1993 View Post
    Boy, you got more excuses than a pregnant Nun. The fact is Vettel wasted championships worthy Ferrari cars and got his rare end handed to him by Hamilton. And we all saw how he handles pressure, three races in a row in fact.



  26. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by tifosi1993 View Post
    Boy, you got more excuses than a pregnant Nun. The fact is Vettel wasted championships worthy Ferrari cars and got his rare end handed to him by Hamilton. And we all saw how he handles pressure, three races in a row in fact.
    Muahahahaha......u tell him and set him straight tifosi1993....vettel may be good, but NOT as good and consistent driver as hamilton or alonso will ever be....
    if he doesn't have a rochetship under him to qualify on Pole and run away with victory, he's totally lost....he's NEVER won a race outside of P3.....that must tell someone someting

    end of story
    ...the new SF90 in the MATTE RED, to me it looks amazing. Let's hope it's gonna be as FAST as it looks.


  27. #117
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    And here we go again...
    "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

  28. #118
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    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Harley View Post
    And here we go again...
    https://youtu.be/sGNK-cOtxSs

  29. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Harley View Post
    And here we go again...
    Can we put 2018 at rest and Ham Alo Vet comparation, and focus on the title of the thread.... 2019 news?

    Can we please?

  30. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    455
    Yea, lets just move on. It hurt, I mean, it hurt us Tifosi's badly last year, but it was LAST year. We cant change anything now. Lets focus on this year, lets hope Vettel and the Team has a good year this year, hope they learnt from mistakes and just win the title this year. Lets keep head down, eyes forward.

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